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Omaha Tribe to celebrate pow-wow

Annual harvest celebration dates back 209 years

0261vMacy, NE (August 21, 2013) — The Omaha Tribe of Nebraska is hosting the 209th Umonhon Hedewachi, or Harvest Celebration, this weekend in Macy.  The Omaha Tribe originated this form of the pow-wow, known as the Hethuska in the Omaha language.

The four day event starting Thursday features a variety of Native American performers singing and dancing, including taildances and gourd dances.  The event is open to the public and is a good opportunity to appreciate the Omaha Tribe’s heritage, culture, regalia, and people.

Macy is on the Omaha Indian Reservation in Thurston County in northwest Nebraska, a short drive from Omaha, Lincoln or Sioux City and surrounding areas.  The pow-wow is held at the pow-wow grounds on the west side of Macy.  This year’s emcees are Mitchell Parker and Clifford Wolfe.  More information is available at http://omaha-nsn.gov/tribe/culture/pow-wow/.

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The Omaha Tribe of Nebraska is a federally recognized treaty tribe with a government-to-government relationship with the United States of America.  The Tribe, consisting of nearly 6,000 Native American tribal members, is organized under a written constitution and bylaws adopted in 1936.

CONTACT Darrell Grant at 712-840-1350

Good Earth State Park at Blood Run dedicated

Good Earth State Park at Blood Run dedicated

A new South Dakota state park was dedicated July 19 at Blood Run, which served as an important trading and gathering place for Native Americans from 1350 to 1700 A.D. The Omaha Tribe’s Cultural Preservation Officer, Calvin Harlan, was present along with former Vice-Chairwoman Wynema Morris. Through the work of the TCPO, the Omaha Tribe was able to participate in the decision making process for the new park.

Release: Omaha Tribe’s effort to defend reservation boundary lawsuit gets support of national tribal organization

Village and bar owners’ suit to diminish Omaha Reservation moves to federal court

 

Pender, NE (July 9, 2013) — The National Congress of American Indians recently met and passed a resolution urging its member tribes to support the Omaha Tribe of Nebraska with amicus briefs and monetary assistance to meet critical legal defense funding needs.  A lawsuit by the Village of Pender and local liquor establishment owners seeks to have the Omaha Reservation diminished so that Pender is excluded.  The case started when the Omaha Tribe sought to enforce its federally approved liquor ordinance against Pender liquor establishments.

The Omaha Indian Reservation was established in 1854 by a treaty between the Omaha Tribe and the United States of America.  Its original boundaries included all of present-day Thurston County.  A later treaty in 1865 ceded the northern portion of the Reservation for the use of the Winnebago Tribe.  The plaintiffs claim an 1882 federal law changed the boundaries by authorizing allotments of land for individual tribal members and opening a portion of the Reservation for sale.

The lawsuit has been pending since 2007, when the federal case was put on hold awaiting a tribal court decision.  The tribal court issued its ruling in February, finding that the Reservation was not diminished.  The federal case is now being briefed to Judge Richard Kopf with the U.S. District Court.  Regardless of which way Judge Kopf rules, an appeal from that decision is anticipated.

The Omaha Tribe has incurred over $500,000 in legal fees and expenses to date, with more anticipated with the federal court case.  The Village of Pender enacted a sales tax to fund its legal fees and has reportedly collected more than $600,000.  The Omaha Tribe has sought assistance from the federal government.  An account has been established at Charter West Bank in Walthill, Nebraska, to receive donations.

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The Omaha Tribe of Nebraska is a federally recognized tribe with a government-to-government relationship with the United States of America.  The Tribe, consisting of nearly 6,000 Native American tribal members, is organized under a written constitution and bylaws adopted in 1936.

CONTACT:  Nora Kane at 402-930-1740 or Mark Peterson at 402-930-1764

SOURCE Omaha Tribe of Nebraska, http://www.omaha-nsn.gov

REFERENCE:  Smith et al. v. Parker et al., U.S. Dist. Ct. (D. Neb.), 4:07-cv-03101-RGK-CRZ

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