Gifts of Hope to the Omaha Indian Reservation thanks to One Nation Walking Together

Gifts of hope flyer

Omaha Tribe elections bring new council members and chair

Omaha Tribe elections bring new council members and chair

Staggered elections sees four council members continue in office

Macy, Nebraska, Omaha Indian Reservation (November 14, 2013) – In elections last Tuesday for the Omaha Tribal Council, former councilman Clifford Wolfe, Jr. and new council members Vernon Miller and Adriana Saunsoci were elected to three-year terms.  Five candidates were on the ballot for three positions on the seven-member council.  The other candidates were Amen Sheridan and Carlton LeCount.

At the Omaha Tribal Council’s organizational meeting, the Council appointed Clifford Wolfe, Jr. as Tribal Chairman.  The other officers were reappointed, with Doran Morris, Jr. continuing to serve as Vice-Chairman, Gwen Porter continuing as Secretary, and Tillie Aldrich continuing as Treasurer.  Jeff Miller rounds out the council membership. Due to staggered terms, council officers serve one-year terms.  The council members elect officers and appoint committee members to seven council committees.

Chairman Clifford Wolfe Jr., a tribal elder, has served previously on the Tribal Council. Wolfe looks forward to continuing the progress the Omaha Tribe has been making towards rebuilding its assets damaged by the Missouri River flooding.  Vernon Miller is the former Business Teacher at Omaha Nation Public School in Macy, Nebraska.  Adriana Saunsoci is a former employee at CarlT. Curtis Health Education Center, the Omaha Tribe’s health care facility in Macy.

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The Omaha Tribe of Nebraska is a federally recognized treaty tribe with a government-to-government relationship with the United States of America.  The Tribe, consisting of nearly 6,000 Native American tribal members, is organized under a written constitution and bylaws adopted in 1936.

Images: Omaha Tribal CouncilVernon Miller

Contact:        
Gwen Porter, Omaha Tribal Secretary, 402-837-5391gporter@omahatribe.com
Clifford Wolfe, Jr., Omaha Tribal Chairman, 402-837-5391
Vernon Miller, Omaha Tribal Councilmember, 402-837-5391
Adriana Saunsoci, Omaha Tribal Councilmember, 402-837-5391

Tribe expresses sympathies to family of fallen outdoorsman

This past weekend, a group of five men hunting deer on the Omaha Indian Reservation experienced a tragedy when one of the hunters was fatally shot. Timothy B. Bush, an outdoorsman from the City of Omaha, died of his injuries. The Omaha Tribal Council expresses its sincere sympathies to Mr. Bush’s family and loved ones. The Tribe’s Wildlife & Parks Department issues permits to hunters for seasonal hunting in the Tribe’s prime woodlands areas.  Hunting safety tips can be found here.

Omaha Tribe to celebrate pow-wow

Annual harvest celebration dates back 209 years

0261vMacy, NE (August 21, 2013) — The Omaha Tribe of Nebraska is hosting the 209th Umonhon Hedewachi, or Harvest Celebration, this weekend in Macy.  The Omaha Tribe originated this form of the pow-wow, known as the Hethuska in the Omaha language.

The four day event starting Thursday features a variety of Native American performers singing and dancing, including taildances and gourd dances.  The event is open to the public and is a good opportunity to appreciate the Omaha Tribe’s heritage, culture, regalia, and people.

Macy is on the Omaha Indian Reservation in Thurston County in northwest Nebraska, a short drive from Omaha, Lincoln or Sioux City and surrounding areas.  The pow-wow is held at the pow-wow grounds on the west side of Macy.  This year’s emcees are Mitchell Parker and Clifford Wolfe.  More information is available at http://omaha-nsn.gov/tribe/culture/pow-wow/.

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The Omaha Tribe of Nebraska is a federally recognized treaty tribe with a government-to-government relationship with the United States of America.  The Tribe, consisting of nearly 6,000 Native American tribal members, is organized under a written constitution and bylaws adopted in 1936.

CONTACT Darrell Grant at 712-840-1350

Good Earth State Park at Blood Run dedicated

Good Earth State Park at Blood Run dedicated

A new South Dakota state park was dedicated July 19 at Blood Run, which served as an important trading and gathering place for Native Americans from 1350 to 1700 A.D. The Omaha Tribe’s Cultural Preservation Officer, Calvin Harlan, was present along with former Vice-Chairwoman Wynema Morris. Through the work of the TCPO, the Omaha Tribe was able to participate in the decision making process for the new park.

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