210TH UMONHON HEDEWACHI – AUGUST 7 – 10, 2014

Make plans now to attend the Omaha Tribe’s 210th Harvest Celebration in Macy!

Omaha Tribe elections bring new council members and chair

Omaha Tribe elections bring new council members and chair

Staggered elections sees four council members continue in office

Macy, Nebraska, Omaha Indian Reservation (November 14, 2013) – In elections last Tuesday for the Omaha Tribal Council, former councilman Clifford Wolfe, Jr. and new council members Vernon Miller and Adriana Saunsoci were elected to three-year terms.  Five candidates were on the ballot for three positions on the seven-member council.  The other candidates were Amen Sheridan and Carlton LeCount.

At the Omaha Tribal Council’s organizational meeting, the Council appointed Clifford Wolfe, Jr. as Tribal Chairman.  The other officers were reappointed, with Doran Morris, Jr. continuing to serve as Vice-Chairman, Gwen Porter continuing as Secretary, and Tillie Aldrich continuing as Treasurer.  Jeff Miller rounds out the council membership. Due to staggered terms, council officers serve one-year terms.  The council members elect officers and appoint committee members to seven council committees.

Chairman Clifford Wolfe Jr., a tribal elder, has served previously on the Tribal Council. Wolfe looks forward to continuing the progress the Omaha Tribe has been making towards rebuilding its assets damaged by the Missouri River flooding.  Vernon Miller is the former Business Teacher at Omaha Nation Public School in Macy, Nebraska.  Adriana Saunsoci is a former employee at CarlT. Curtis Health Education Center, the Omaha Tribe’s health care facility in Macy.

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The Omaha Tribe of Nebraska is a federally recognized treaty tribe with a government-to-government relationship with the United States of America.  The Tribe, consisting of nearly 6,000 Native American tribal members, is organized under a written constitution and bylaws adopted in 1936.

Images: Omaha Tribal CouncilVernon Miller

Contact:        
Gwen Porter, Omaha Tribal Secretary, 402-837-5391gporter@omahatribe.com
Clifford Wolfe, Jr., Omaha Tribal Chairman, 402-837-5391
Vernon Miller, Omaha Tribal Councilmember, 402-837-5391
Adriana Saunsoci, Omaha Tribal Councilmember, 402-837-5391

Omaha Tribe declares state of emergency after tornado damages homes in Macy

Macy, Omaha Indian Reservation (October 9, 2013) — A tornado that touched down in Macy on Saturday, October 5, 2013, injured two residents, damaged five homes to the extent they were deemed uninhabitable, and damaged a business.  The Omaha Tribe has declared a state of emergency to coordinate response efforts in order to meet the needs of the displaced residents and repair the damage.

The response from neighboring communities has been swift and generous.  The American Red Cross set up an emergency shelter in Macy. Additional assistance has been provided by the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska, Thurston County, the Village of Decatur, and numerous individual volunteers.

“The people and families affected by this storm were caught off guard and find themselves facing an uphill battle to rebuild some sense of normalcy.  The Tribal Council is grateful for the outpouring of assistance to the families so far,” stated Rodney Morris, the Omaha Tribal Chairman.

The Omaha Tribe is assisting four of the displaced families by contributing new trailer homes, which are on-site and in the process of being installed. This requires skirting, electrical and plumbing hook-ups, and related work. A fifth family will be rebuilding their home assuming insurance covers the cost.

The displaced families still have unmet needs, including groceries, toiletries, bedding, furniture and household goods.  Contributions can be delivered to the Omaha Tribe Emergency Management office at 303 Main Street in Walthill, Nebraska.  Monetary donations can be sent to Charter West National Bank, 308 Main Street, Walthill, Nebraska 68067 or (402) 846-5441. People can make a donation to support Red Cross Disaster Relief by visiting www.redcross.org, calling 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or texting the word REDCROSS to 90999 to make a $10 donation.

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The Omaha Tribe of Nebraska is a federally recognized treaty tribe with a government-to-government relationship with the United States of America.  The Tribe, consisting of nearly 6,000 Native American tribal members, is organized under a written constitution and bylaws adopted in 1936.

CONTACT:  Kenna Robinson or Joseph Jackson at 402-846-5166

SOURCE Omaha Tribe of Nebraska, http://www.omaha-nsn.gov

Omaha Tribe to celebrate pow-wow

Annual harvest celebration dates back 209 years

0261vMacy, NE (August 21, 2013) — The Omaha Tribe of Nebraska is hosting the 209th Umonhon Hedewachi, or Harvest Celebration, this weekend in Macy.  The Omaha Tribe originated this form of the pow-wow, known as the Hethuska in the Omaha language.

The four day event starting Thursday features a variety of Native American performers singing and dancing, including taildances and gourd dances.  The event is open to the public and is a good opportunity to appreciate the Omaha Tribe’s heritage, culture, regalia, and people.

Macy is on the Omaha Indian Reservation in Thurston County in northwest Nebraska, a short drive from Omaha, Lincoln or Sioux City and surrounding areas.  The pow-wow is held at the pow-wow grounds on the west side of Macy.  This year’s emcees are Mitchell Parker and Clifford Wolfe.  More information is available at http://omaha-nsn.gov/tribe/culture/pow-wow/.

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The Omaha Tribe of Nebraska is a federally recognized treaty tribe with a government-to-government relationship with the United States of America.  The Tribe, consisting of nearly 6,000 Native American tribal members, is organized under a written constitution and bylaws adopted in 1936.

CONTACT Darrell Grant at 712-840-1350

Release: Omaha Tribe’s effort to defend reservation boundary lawsuit gets support of national tribal organization

Village and bar owners’ suit to diminish Omaha Reservation moves to federal court

 

Pender, NE (July 9, 2013) — The National Congress of American Indians recently met and passed a resolution urging its member tribes to support the Omaha Tribe of Nebraska with amicus briefs and monetary assistance to meet critical legal defense funding needs.  A lawsuit by the Village of Pender and local liquor establishment owners seeks to have the Omaha Reservation diminished so that Pender is excluded.  The case started when the Omaha Tribe sought to enforce its federally approved liquor ordinance against Pender liquor establishments.

The Omaha Indian Reservation was established in 1854 by a treaty between the Omaha Tribe and the United States of America.  Its original boundaries included all of present-day Thurston County.  A later treaty in 1865 ceded the northern portion of the Reservation for the use of the Winnebago Tribe.  The plaintiffs claim an 1882 federal law changed the boundaries by authorizing allotments of land for individual tribal members and opening a portion of the Reservation for sale.

The lawsuit has been pending since 2007, when the federal case was put on hold awaiting a tribal court decision.  The tribal court issued its ruling in February, finding that the Reservation was not diminished.  The federal case is now being briefed to Judge Richard Kopf with the U.S. District Court.  Regardless of which way Judge Kopf rules, an appeal from that decision is anticipated.

The Omaha Tribe has incurred over $500,000 in legal fees and expenses to date, with more anticipated with the federal court case.  The Village of Pender enacted a sales tax to fund its legal fees and has reportedly collected more than $600,000.  The Omaha Tribe has sought assistance from the federal government.  An account has been established at Charter West Bank in Walthill, Nebraska, to receive donations.

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The Omaha Tribe of Nebraska is a federally recognized tribe with a government-to-government relationship with the United States of America.  The Tribe, consisting of nearly 6,000 Native American tribal members, is organized under a written constitution and bylaws adopted in 1936.

CONTACT:  Nora Kane at 402-930-1740 or Mark Peterson at 402-930-1764

SOURCE Omaha Tribe of Nebraska, http://www.omaha-nsn.gov

REFERENCE:  Smith et al. v. Parker et al., U.S. Dist. Ct. (D. Neb.), 4:07-cv-03101-RGK-CRZ

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