OMAHA NATION ABUSE INTERVENTION
SURVIVOR SPOTLIGHT

>A Recent Success

The Omaha Nation Abuse Intervention Program would like to take this time to recognize and honor a survivor of domestic violence from our Omaha Tribe Community.The person spotlighted for our weekly Survivor Spotlight has shown a tremendous amount of courage and bravery in coming forth and speaking out against Domestic Violence. Not only that but taking the step to leave a situation that was not healthy for her and her children, knowing the risks involved could lead to an unsafe situations. She has stepped forward to help herself by providing a healthier and safer environment for her children.

October 12-October 18, 2014
GET TO KNOW HER
Our survivor of Domestic Violence is a 27 year old female, who is enrolled with the Omaha Tribe of Nebraska. She is the mother of five children. Currently she is looking for permanent housing with her children, and trying to reconstruct her life after her traumatic domestic violence ordeal. Survivor does have a safe place to reside.
Q: What kind of abuse did you endure?
A: I have been through almost every type of abuse. It ranged from verbal abuse to physical abuse. Which ultimately, I ended up being mentally & emotionally abused from the other forms of abuse. There has also been harassment from my abuser as well.
Q: How have you learned to deal with domestic violence?
A: I take it day by day. It can be overwhelming and scary but each day gets a little easier. Having a support system in place; like ONAIP, family & friends, has helped me in dealing with my situation a lot. Knowing I have someone who cares about me and loves me enough to help me get away is the greatest blessing.
“Do not be a shamed of your story, it may inspire others.” – Unknown
Q: What would you be willing to share with others in a similar situation?
A: Don’t be afraid to leave because your children are watching and they see all the hurt and trauma your going through. But once you leave, they see how strong and independent you are as a mother.

Q: Where do you see yourself in a year from today?
A: A year from today I see a strong, independent woman. A woman who my children can rely on and look up to for guidance. I would like to be a role model to my children and other survivors of domestic violence. Someone others can turn to for advice and knowledge on domestic violence.
Together we can end Domestic Violence & Sexual Assault.
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A RECENT SUCCESS
The Omaha Nation Abuse Intervention Program would like to take this time to recognize and honor a survivor of Domestic Violence & Sexual
Assault from our Omaha Tribe Community.
The person spotlighted for our weekly Survivor Spotlight has shown a tremendous amount of courage and bravery in coming forth and speaking out against
Domestic Violence & Sexual Assault.
Our Survivor has experience marital rape, severe, extreme domestic violence, verbal and mental abuse from her first husband, as well as physical, mental and verbal abuse from her second husband over a span of 32 years.

GET TO KNOW HER
Our survivor of Sexual Violence is a 53 year old female, who is enrolled with the Omaha Tribe of Nebraska. She is the mother of six children and grandmother of 20 grandchildren.
Q: What kind of abuse did you endure?
A: When I married my first husband, I endure extreme physical abuse, verbal abuse & sexual assault from my husband. After having divorced my first husband I remarried my second husband and in that relationship I endured severe abuse from him as well. I have suffered approximately 32 years of abuse with both exhusbands, ranging from verbal, mental, physical and sexual abuse.
Q: How have you learned to deal with your sexual assault?
A: After realizing my first relationship wasn’t going to be anything but abuse, I got away. I got a job to raise my children and provide a home for my family. It took me 16 years of abuse with my first husband before I finally left. Then I got into another relationship, where the abuse started right off for about 10 years out of the 16 years we were together. I have gone through extreme, severe abuse, & have dealt with controlling husband(s).

“I hope this reaches someone out there. This could save someone’s life”- Spotlight Survivor

Q: What would you be willing to share with others in a similar situation?
A: When abuse starts, it will never get better and no matter what you do or say, it will continue. I have always thought that if I did what they wanted it would get better but it never did, it got worse. How I made it out alive, I am not sure at all. My advice to people, even teenagers, is to get out before it gets to the point where you feel like your being trapped because there is so much fears that no one will be able to help, not even friends, family and even law enforcement. There is help, don’t be afraid.
by turning to alcohol, not knowing how to handle it. Back in the day, there was no counseling services for victims of abuse. I set my mind and did it on my own. It still bothers me to this day. What hurts
me the most is that my kids have witnessed my abuse and still remember what was done to me. It will always be with me but I have learned to deal with it.

Q: What is your current situation?
A: I am now retired, I am a stay at home grandmother and I look back at the years and I know that God was watching over me because He brought me this far. I can honestly say that I am enjoying life now with my children and grandchildren.
May God bless those of you who are out there in a situation that was similar to mine, there is help.

A SUCCESS
The Omaha Nation Abuse Intervention Program would like to take this time to recognize and honor a survivor of Domestic Violence & Stalking from our Omaha Tribe Community.
The person spotlighted for our weekly Survivor Spotlight has shown a tremendous amount of courage and bravery in coming forth and speaking out against Domestic Violence & Stalking.

ABOUT OUR SURVIVOR
Our survivor of Domestic Violence & Stalking is a 30 year old female and mother of one child, who is residing on the Omaha Tribe of Nebraska reservation. She has been in several abusive relationships but now is living a happy life.

Q: What kind of abuse did you endure?
A: I was with my partner for approximately a year. I experienced domestic violence in the forms of severe verbal abuse, emotional abuse and stalking. After being unable to live with the verbal abuse any longer (I was constantly belittled, called horrible, foul terms) I left him. This was when the stalking began. I was stalked in my new home (constantly driving by to see where I was or who I was with), so badly that if I knew he was coming by, I would leave very quickly. I was stalked in my work environment. He would constantly pace the halls and ask coworkers where I was. He gave me no peace. One day he would propose marriage, the next day he would threaten to get me fired. It got to the point that even hearing the sound of similar footsteps gave me anxiety, and does to this day.
Q: How have you learned to deal with your situation?
A: The final straw was when he put my job in jeopardy. Although I had informed people at work, I had no support or protection. He even turned things around on me to make them look like they were my fault. After he directly threatened my job, I called the court and was recommended to ONAIP because there was domestic violence and stalking involved. That same day, I was assisted in filling out an order of protection. Working with ONAIP helped me see that I was minimizing what was going on and that I didn’t have to live like that anymore. I finally realized I had options, and that people were on my side. I now have year-long protection and the stalking has stopped. It didn’t stop immediately, but finally did with law enforcement enforcing the order of protection.
It’s not funny, it’s not romantic & it’s not cute! Stalking is a dangerous & it’s a crime.
Q: What would you be willing to share with others in a similar situation?
A: My regret is that I put up with the threats and the stalking for so long. I could have had it stopped much quicker. My advice is to ask for an order of protection as soon as the stalking and harassment starts. Waiting for it to get better doesn’t help. When someone is abusing you, they’re not going to just stop.
Q: How has this affected your life?
A: I am still nervous when I hear certain footsteps in the hall, but I have learned to let people know what’s going on, so I am safe. I no longer wait until a situation escalates. I also feel so much more empowered; knowing that there are people willing to stand up for me and help me. Once I asked for help from ONAIP, I was no longer alone. Having their help and support and knowing I can reach them 24/7 got me through a very difficult time.